Get your Lunchmeat Underpants to go.

Lunchmeat Underpants

Lunchmeat Underpants

New Stuff and Inspiration

Digital creative optimization. Why so many syllables and so much confusion?

confused

We’ve all been there. In a meeting or on a call and someone lobs out a term that we’re sort of familiar with, but don’t totally understand. Digital creative optimization is one of those.

Explain it to me in a way that won’t give me an aneurysm.
Using fancy-robot-math to learn which versions of your digital ads are working the best with certain types of people. Then running more of those.

That sounds okay. But should I care?
It helps increase the likelihood that the ads you are running are working with the people you are trying to reach.

It can also help you learn some lessons about what types of messages might be more effective with certain types of people. For example, maybe Millennials aren’t crazy about the idea of booking a test drive of your fancy new car model, but are really into going to your social page to see video reviews.

When does it work the best?
Research has shown that it can increase click-through-performance by 47% and post-click conversions by 69%. But there are certain industries where it is more commonly used: automotive, travel, finance and retail (e-commerce).

Why? These are industries that sell a ton of different stuff. And pricing and promotions are always changing. Which is why dynamic marketing becomes really helpful.

What’s the process like?

  1. Start with your messaging strategy, then build different variants of your ads.
  2. Set up different algorithms to measure the important KPIs of the campaign. Things like conversion rates or social shares are great.
  3. As the campaign launches, the algorithms will track the performance of the different variations against the goal you’ve defined. Once the campaign has run long enough to determine which ones are working best, it automatically increases the frequency of those variations.

What shouldn’t I do?
Start trying to optimize the hell out of everything at once.

Testing multiple ads at once can cause a lot of confusion and make things much more difficult to manage. To avoid making that headache for yourself, start small. Try looking at the impact of a few different message variants on a single audience with one small campaign.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInGoogle+